Data protection assessment and transparency deficits in technology use

An analysis using the example of police data processing

Authors

  • Hartmut Aden Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht, Forschungsinstitut für Öffentliche und Private Sicherheit (FÖPS Berlin) (Deutschland)
  • Jan Fährmann Hochschule für Wirtschaft und Recht, Forschungsinstitut für Öffentliche und Private Sicherheit (FÖPS Berlin) (Deutschland)

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.14512/tatup.29.3.24

Keywords:

data protection, policing, privacy, technology, accountability

Abstract

Since 2018, EU data protection law requires a Data Protection Impact Assessment (DPIA) for any data processing that involves high risks to the rights and freedoms of natural persons. This paper examines the possibilities for transparent and fundamental rights-protecting policing that this legal framework offers. Many politicians and police officials tend to place more emphasis on security than on transparency, democratic accountability of policing, and high standards of privacy. This can be counteracted by higher transparency standards in police data processing and by designing technology based on privacy by design.

Published

15.12.2020

How to Cite

1.
Aden H, Fährmann J. Data protection assessment and transparency deficits in technology use: An analysis using the example of police data processing. TATuP [Internet]. 2020 Dec. 15 [cited 2021 Jul. 30];29(3):24-9. Available from: https://tatup.de/index.php/tatup/article/view/6832